Printoo paper-thin modules can bring more to 3D printing technologies

Printoo paper-thin modules can bring more to 3D printing technologies

Extremely thin and flexible electronics will soon appear. Portuguese company Ynvisible are going to introduce a quick switch from the lab to tinkerers’ hands in a short time, beginning today with a number absolutely thin. The module equipment known as Printoo, vary from solar cells as small as a credit card to small-sized motor drivers. There are light-emitting diode, which looks like batteries smaller than 1 millimeter thick and bluetooth chips for you to control it all from your mobile phone or laptop.

Printoo paper-thin modules can bring more to 3D printing technologies

Some Printoo kits include a paper-thin display that can show numbers. It could be used to create a basic counter. Photo: Ynvisible.

The majority of the modules are placed on a paper-like sheet protected by printed circuits. The latter it will be created for shipping labels and tiny spacecraft that NASA is planning to send to Mars, but they could be unusual for ordinary people to use them. They could as well be linked with circuits created at home on a circuit printer or pen. Ynvisible hopes that DIYers and 3D printer owners will like and accept Printoo as they already know Arduino. The modules are quite small to slip in a 3D printed thing, making it easy to develop robots and other devices. One could either wear them as bracelets or sewn to garments.

Printoo is a popular campaign expected to appear this year. It is believed to make connected devices available for average users. Kits’ prices range from $45 to $550 and are expected to appear in October.

 

Printoo paper-thin modules can bring more to 3D printing technologies

The Printoo modules are on a flexible material covered in printed circuits. Photo: Ynvisible.

 

New to 3D Printing? Check out our 3D Printing basics section, find the answer on popular question what is 3d printing and learn about many other interesting things.
Also read:  New Studies from University of Texas Suggest Moderation in 3D Printing to Avoid Ill Effects

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *